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Corporate Housing Toronto

Community Events, Downtown Toronto, Downtown Toronto Condos

Events in Downtown Toronto for April and May

April 22, 2015

Spring is finally upon us in Toronto as the weather has warmed up after a long winter. Here are our favourite events in Downtown Toronto for April and May that may be close to your furnished apartment, whether you are in the city for a short-term or long-term stay.

Events in Downtown Toronto1. Hot Docs (April 23- May 3)
Located across the city, Hot Docs is the Canadian International Documentary festival and North America’s larger documentary film festival. Films in over 25 topics are guaranteed to spark discussion and best of all, many of the theatres are in short walking distance to our downtown Toronto properties such as the Icon, the Element, and 300 Front Street.

2. CONTACT Photography Festival (May)
The world’s largest photography festival continues to excite and engage every May for the entire month. Pick your favourite exhibits and spend an afternoon with a friend, whether the photography is at a cafeEvents in Downtown Toronto or an art gallery. The May 1 Festival launch party at MOCCA is one of the highlights. The best part? It’s free and a great way to explore the city, even if in walking distance to your short-term or long-term furnished suite.

3. Canadian Music Week (CMW) (May 1 -10)
The highlight of CMW is the music festival which showcases some of Canada’s top talents in the music industry. Catch a show at one of the many venues across the city, a short stumble away from our downtown suites (conveniently located).

Events in Downtown Toronto4. Doors Open (May 23 and 24)
This is your chance to see Toronto’s historical buildings, many of which are normally closed to the public. Bring your camera to capture some fantastic architecture the city has to offer. Many museums and buildings are close to all of our furnished apartments and suites across the city, including our Midtown Toronto and Etobicoke locations.

What events in downtown Toronto are you most looking forward to this spring?

Business Travel, Downtown Toronto, Entertainment, Events, Family Vacations in Toronto, Lifestyle talk

Things You Should Know About Living in Toronto

April 17, 2015

Living in TorontoToronto is a great city in which to live (welcome!) and according to the Global Liveability Report (2014), Toronto has been recognized as being one of the five most liveable cities in the world. We have a rising economy, a good mix of nature along the edges of our downtown core, a good standard of living, and are one of the most multicultural-friendly cities in the world. However, as with other major urban centres, Toronto has its quirks that you have to navigate as a resident. Talking to our team is a good start to help you learn more about Toronto living. Here’s our guide to what you should know about living in Toronto.

1. Harsh Winters and Hot Summers
What you hear about Toronto’s winters are true: they can be extremely cold. Lately, however, temperatures fluctuate. One day the temperature can be a balmy 10 degrees celsius; another day, they can drop to minus 25 degrees celsius. Dressing in layers is crucial when living in Toronto. Equally, summers can be hot and humid and downtown smog permeates the air in the downtown core. Another reminder to keep your umbrella handy as Toronto’s rainfall has increased in the past few years. Having a humidifier or air purifier will keep the air fresh in your furnished apartment in Toronto.

Living in Toronto

2. Transportation
Other than driving, there are a few ways to get around the city, a very large one at that, and depending on where you go, it’s an average of 30 minutes to get anywhere in the city. The Toronto Transit Commission, also known as the TTC, is one of the most central ways to get around the large metropolis. It extends from Scarborough to Etobicoke (east to west) and Finch/Steeles to Union Station at Front Street (north to south). An average fare on the TTC is $3.00. If you’re looking for a quicker alternative, you can take a taxi in the city, with a starting rate at $4.50. Cabs in Toronto can be notoriously expensive so be careful. An average ride from outside the downtown core can cost $20 to $25. Uber or Uber X is also another alternative. If you are traveling to the suburbs such as Markham, Mississauga, or Brampton, the GO Transit system (via bus or train) will help you get there efficiently if you don’t drive. Prices vary based on your destination; however, an average price to Mississauga one way is $7.Living in Toronto

3. Rush Hour
Rush hour in Toronto lasts from 6:30am to 9:30am during morning weekdays and around 4:00pm to 6:30pm during weekday evenings. It is at its peak during 8am and 5 to 6pm, respectively. Traffic congestion is one of the major issues as Toronto has expanded. If you live downtown or near your workplace in one of our central locations, the best alternative is to walk or bike to work to avoid the crowds altogether. On the TTC, do expect to wait one or two trains, especially on the Yonge/University line due to congestion. Union Station is also in a state of significant transformation with new exits so give yourself time to navigate in the morning. Alternatively, you can commute in less peak hours to give yourself plenty of time to reach your destination.

Living in Toronto

4. Construction
Toronto continues to expand significantly as it has done so over the past 10 to 15 years. Over 100,000 condominium units are currently being constructed (source) and according to a report in the Toronto Star, our metropolis is home to more than 44 high rises exceeding 150 metres. As the city gears up for the Pan Am Games, you’ll see a lot of delays on major routes, the main one being the Lakeshore between Yonge and Spadina, which is slowly but surely improving in terms of development. Always map out your route and double check the TTC website before you travel anywhere in the city if you don’t know it well. Downtown, it may be easier to walk certain places than it is to take the TTC.

Living in Toronto

5. A City of Neighbourhoods
Toronto is known as a city of neighbourhoods (complete with our own toques!) and the best part of this city is feeling like you’re constantly a tourist, whether it’s trying a new, ethnic restaurant or going to a cultural event. If you like to be near the water, The Beaches, Scarborough Bluffs, or Lakeshore West might be good options for you. Downtown, you are close to the funkiest areas complete with shopping, restaurants and nightlife downtown or by Queen, King, or Kensington Market. Yorkville and Rosedale/Summerhill are a bit more lush. North York is right by the subway line with plenty of parks and dining options. For those wanting more family-friendly neighbourhoods, Roncesvalles, High Park, The Danforth, and Leslieville are great options.

Living in Toronto

6. It Can Be Difficult to Meet People
Living in a big and constantly changing urban centre like Toronto can make it difficult to meet people. The best solution to this urban issue is to join a club. There are plenty of interesting clubs out there depending on your interest. The Toronto Sport and Social Club is a great addition to your workout routine, or you could join a quirky club like an axe throwing league (yes, that exists!). Volunteering is another way to meet new friends while giving back to the community. Sites like Charity Village can help you find what interests you. Likely, there is a club for whatever your interest happens to be.

Of course, do check out any events happening where you can meet other residents in your DelSuites condo.

A big city like Toronto can take a bit of getting used to but once you settle into the city (and your short term rental in Toronto, which will make life a bit easier for you), you’ll find yourself calling it home sooner than later. Just make sure you pronounce it “Toronna” and not “Tore-on-tow.”

Business Travel, Family Vacations in Toronto, Toronto Family Travel, Vacation Travel

10 Things You can Carry on a Plane

March 27, 2015

Things you can Carry on a Plane Since 9/11, travel has gotten much more restrictive but it doesn’t mean that that are there aren’t certain things that you still can’t bring on a plane. The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSCA) is the official source of what items to carry on a plane. Some are a bit quirky. Others are a bit more practical. When you are traveling, here are our top picks of things you can carry on a plane.

1. Axes. Looks like that Battle Axe League in Toronto is really taking off!
2. Breast Milk. Passengers flying with or without their child will be permitted to bring breast milk in quantities greater than 100 ml provided it is presented to the Screening Officer for inspection prior to screening. Gel or ice packs are also permitted.
3. Corkscrews. Without the attached knife, your corkscrew is permitted on your carry-on or checked luggage. Things you can Carry on a PlaneYour swiss army knife will likely be confiscated.
4. Cremated Remains. Cremated remains in a container may be packed as part of your carry-on baggage. The container, however, must pass separately through the x-ray machine. For more information, please check the special procedures in place for screening cremated remains.
5. Razor Blades and blade cartridges. Razor blades that are encased in their plastic holders (disposable razors and razor blade cartridges) are permitted in carry-on baggage.
6. Ink/Toner Cartridges. You can carry-on but surprisingly, not check ink or toner cartridges in your baggage. Note: Ink cartridges things you can carry on a planewith a capacity of 17.6 oz. (500 g.) or more are not permitted in checked baggage for all flights – domestic, U.S. and international.
7. Juice for babies and baby food. Other things you can carry on a plane are baby formula, food, juice, water and other baby items – these are allowed in your carry-on baggage or personal items. You can take these through the security checkpoints and aboard your plane. However, you must be travelling with an infant under two years of age (0-24 months). You may bring gel or ice packs to keep your baby products cool. All items including formula must be presented to the Screening Officer and will be inspected.
8. Non-prescription medication. These items are considered to be essential non-prescription medications. You are allowed to carry volumes greater than 100 ml (3.4 oz.) in your carry-on baggage. These liquids must be declared to the Screening Officer separately. Documentation to support your medical needs or condition is not required; however, if you feel that it would help ease your screening, it should be presented to the screening officer along with your medically necessary items.
9. Protein Powder
10. Syringes. Must be for personal medical use, and the needle guard must be in place. The person must possess medication that is to be administered by means of the syringe or needle and biojectors. To facilitate screening, CATSA recommends that the medication be properly labelled (professionally printed label identifying the medication or a manufacturer’s name or pharmaceutical label – For more information, click here.

What are your essential items for carrying on a plane?

Community Events, Downtown Toronto, Entertainment, Family Vacations in Toronto, Holiday Events, Toronto Family Travel, Vacation Travel

Five March Break Activities for the Family

March 17, 2015

Schools Out! March BreakIf you are not one of the 116,000 people traveling during the March Break period (March 16-20), this is your time to explore Toronto with your family. We have written about our favourite family-friendly activities in Toronto previously here, but here are a few March break activities and ideas to keep your children entertained during the week.

1. Disney Classics at the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Watch some of the famed movie maker’s classics on the big screen and relive your childhood too! If you’re staying in one of our furnished suites downtown, there is no excuse not to go to these special screenings. There are also March Break camps and to start planning early, summer camps for your kids.

2. The Toronto Public Library’s (TPL) March Break Program. The TPL has a variety of activities for both kids and teens, including a Lego program and a first-aid babysitting course.

March Break Activities3. A Day Trip. One of  our favourite March Break activities for the day would be to the Kortright Centre for Conservation, where you and your kids can learn about sustainability, hike, and also participate in their maple syrup programs. Nearby, is the McMichael Art Gallery, a great alternative from the Art Gallery of Ontario to learn about Canadian art. March Break camps are also available here. The Toronto Zoo is another great idea for a day trip if your kids love animals; they have special programming for the week.

4. Stay In. Sometimes, a day at home is overrated. Cook with the kids. Break out the arts and crafts. Watch a favourite or new movie on the couch or have a sleepover for your kids and their friends. Many of our locations also have a pool so this might be a fun way to break up your days.

5. Visit the Aga Khan Museum. One of Toronto’s newest attractions, the architectural masterpiece is also your gateway to learn more about Muslim civilizations. The museum and all of its exhibitions are free every Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. There is also a special March Break camp for your kids. If you are brave enough and have the energgroup students jumping end of exam yeary, you could also plan an excursion afterwards to the Ontario Science Centre, which is located nearby.

What are your favourite March break activities to do with your family in the city? However, if you are traveling with your family, here are some of our tips to handle the journey with ease.

Downtown Toronto, Food & Recipes, Lifestyle talk, Toronto Condos

Top 5 Restaurants and Cafes for Comfort Food in Toronto

February 6, 2015

Restaurants and Cafes for Comfort Food in TorontoAs the winter continues to chill Toronto’s city streets, we seek comfort in our favourite foods. Those childhood classics are popping up throughout Toronto’s eateries. Here are a few of our favourite restaurants and cafes for comfort food in Toronto.Restaurants and Cafes for Comfort Food in Toronto

1. Cheesewerks. If you’re looking for a twist on all things cheese related like grilled cheese sandwich, Mac N’ Cheese, and fondue it’s here. Located near many of our properties downtown including the Element location, the eatery also offers cheese-related events for you and your family.

2. Ravi Soups. Ravi’s curried lentil and apricot soup offers a warm and cozy escape away from Toronto’s frigid temperatures. Our pick for a sandwich for their valuable soup and sandwich combos is the curried lamb wrap.

Restaurants and Cafes for Comfort Food in Toronto3. The Queen and Beaver. This gastropub and its sister pub, The Oxley in Yorkville, are known for its Sunday Roast. In many variations (traditional roast beef, beef wellington, slow cooked lamb shoulder), this is a great alternative to cooking a big Sunday dinner for yourself and your family and friends.

4. Pizzeria Libretto. Our favourite place for pizza is also one of our favourite comforts and noone does it better than Libretto with its authentic Neapolitan ovens. A great place for the family, do check out its newest location in the financial district.Restaurants and Cafes for Comfort Food in Toronto

5. Poutini’s and Smoke’s Poutinerie. Though Quebec will always reign king to the classic Canadian staple of poutine, Poutini’s and Smoke’s Poutinerie are our favourite places to get it in downtown Toronto. If you can’t get it after a late night out, Poutini’s now offers lunch delivery service to your office with Foodee and Smoke’s has new locations in Mississauga.

This post is making us hungry! What are your favourite comfort foods? What are your favourite restaurants and cafes for comfort food in Toronto?