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Community Events, Entertainment, Family Vacations in Toronto, Lifestyle talk, Toronto Family Travel, Vacation Travel

Neighbourhood Guide: The Toronto Beaches

July 3, 2015

The Toronto BeachesThe summer season is one the best times to be in Toronto yet sometimes, city living in the summer can be hot, muggy and crowded (even though our furnished suites are centrally located). The Toronto Beaches (or “The Beach,” as it has been intensely debated), located on the eastern edges of the Greater Toronto Region is one of those neighbourhoods which feels like a little village, enabling you to escape the city without having to leave it. Here are a few of our favourite things to do if you have a day to explore the Toronto Beaches.

1. Explore the Martin Goodman Trail. The trail extends from east to west from the three separate parts of the beach along the lakeshore: Balmy, Kew, and Woodbine. The best way to see this is by biking if you’re coming from our furnished apartment rentals at our downtown locations. That said, you can easily walk, run, or rollerblade the three beaches. If you map this out with a few key pit stops in between to picnic or to go to a restaurant on Queen Street East, this is a scenic way to explore the city.The Toronto Beaches

2. Swim! Though the water is deemed safe by the Toronto Department of Public Health (you can check for updates here and on your smartphone), you can also take the opportunity to swim at the Donald D. Summerville Olympic pool. Located at the foot of Woodbine Avenue and in the heart of Woodbine Beach, the pool is currently undergoing a $3.75 million capital renovation project to be completed in time for the Pan Am Games.  If you are here for a longer term stay with your family or you like to swim, you may want to consider enrolling your kids in the Toronto Swim Summer Camp, or as an adult, enrol in the masters swim program or triathlon club.

3. Volleyball. If you pass by the western edge of Woodbine Beach, also known as Ashbridge’s Bay, you’re lucky to see rows of volleyball nets with lively players jumping up to the net with the music blaring to the skies. Want to go beyond people watching and try your hand at a spike? Check out the Ashbridge’s Bay Beach Volleyball Team or find a league through Beach Blast or the Ontario Volleyball Organization.

4. Events. The Toronto Beaches are home to many events, especially in the summertime. The biggest event is the Beaches Jazz Festival in

The Toronto Beaches

Boardwalk- Woodbine beach, Toronto | Photo Credit: Don Gunn

mid-July, which spans for two weeks. All event listings are here.

5. Watch a Movie. Beyond the boardwalk is a lively strip on Queen Street full of businesses, including the Fox Theatre. Located on the fringe of the Beach, this repertory theatre has been in business for over a century and is another way to discover the area and also watch a good film that you may have missed in the theatres.

Whether you’re living in Scarborough, Mississauga, Markham or North York, the Toronto Beaches are a wonderful area to explore and come back to from time to time when you want to escape the “city.”

Business Travel, Family Vacations in Toronto, Lifestyle talk, Relocation

5 Misconceptions About Short-Term Condo Rentals Toronto

May 20, 2015

Moving InAs property development and construction in Toronto has increased so has the need for Short-Term Housing and Condominium Rentals. This concept is still relatively new and thus, there can be many misconceptions. We wanted to clear up the misconceptions and myths of short-term condo rentals Toronto and stays for a better understanding of the industry.

1. Short-Term Condo Rentals Toronto Minimum StaysShort-Term Condo Rentals Toronto
Though “short-term” can mean for less than a week or two in our lexicon, DelSuites minimum stay for their short-term stays are 30 nights. This may sound like a hefty amount for some but if you need a place to stay while you are settling in the city or on business, this minimum day stay will assure you you’ll have a place to call home away from home. Unlike a hotel, you can get to know your neighbours and you never have to move in and out in that 30 day period – lugging around your luggage if you are travelling to and from Toronto. You retain possession of the suite and can leave your luggage at home for the entire 30 nights.

2. Short-Term Condo Rentals Toronto are not Furnished
DelSuites apartments arShort-Term Condo Rentals Torontoe always fully furnished in modern furnishings and decor. Not only do you have your basic amenities but you also get the extras like kitchen appliances, plates, utensils, cleaning supplies, and more. You even have a start up supply of laundry and dish detergent for your en-suite laundry. As opposed to looking for a new apartment in the city and dealing with buying your own furniture or the hassle of a laundromat, DelSuites has you covered.

3. Short-Term Condo Rentals Toronto Don’t Come With the Extras
Though this may be true for some short-term condo rental companies, DelSuites has plenty of amenities. Concierge to help you with any of your needs? Check. Fitness Facilities? Check. Complimentary Wifi and Cable? Check. Grocery services from Real Food Toronto? Check. Airport Pick-up or Drop-Off Service? Check. Welcome Gift for every Child to help settle them in? Check. We’ve taken care of all of the details so you can arrive safe and relaxed.Short-Term Condo Rentals Toronto

4. Short Term Rentals are Not Clean or Well Maintained
We have a cleaning staff that come in once a week to ensure that your apartment or suite is spick and span. Unlike hotel cleaning staff when you don’t know when they’ll be coming on a daily basis, our staff are appointed a specific day to come in to clean from 9am to 5pm and can even work around your schedule.

5. Short Term Rental Costs
Though furnished apartments may seem costly for a short-term stay, when you factor in the costs (housekeeping, free wifi, laundry, a fully stocked kitchen, etc.), the costs can turn out to be less than staying in a hotel. Hotel rooms are usually just that – a room – so if you were to get a suite, a furnished apartment is better value. If you are in the midst of a relocation, DelSuites is a one-stop shop and less cost than aShort-term condo rentals Toronto consultant.

Have you ever stayed in a short-term rental? What was your experience and are these misconceptions true? What have you found to be misconceptions about short-term condominium rentals? Discuss! And if you ever have any questions, please contact us at 416.296.8838 or email us at info@delsuites.com

Business Travel, Downtown Toronto, Entertainment, Events, Family Vacations in Toronto, Lifestyle talk

Things You Should Know About Living in Toronto

April 17, 2015

Living in TorontoToronto is a great city in which to live (welcome!) and according to the Global Liveability Report (2014), Toronto has been recognized as being one of the five most liveable cities in the world. We have a rising economy, a good mix of nature along the edges of our downtown core, a good standard of living, and are one of the most multicultural-friendly cities in the world. However, as with other major urban centres, Toronto has its quirks that you have to navigate as a resident. Talking to our team is a good start to help you learn more about Toronto living. Here’s our guide to what you should know about living in Toronto.

1. Harsh Winters and Hot Summers
What you hear about Toronto’s winters are true: they can be extremely cold. Lately, however, temperatures fluctuate. One day the temperature can be a balmy 10 degrees celsius; another day, they can drop to minus 25 degrees celsius. Dressing in layers is crucial when living in Toronto. Equally, summers can be hot and humid and downtown smog permeates the air in the downtown core. Another reminder to keep your umbrella handy as Toronto’s rainfall has increased in the past few years. Having a humidifier or air purifier will keep the air fresh in your furnished apartment in Toronto.

Living in Toronto

2. Transportation
Other than driving, there are a few ways to get around the city, a very large one at that, and depending on where you go, it’s an average of 30 minutes to get anywhere in the city. The Toronto Transit Commission, also known as the TTC, is one of the most central ways to get around the large metropolis. It extends from Scarborough to Etobicoke (east to west) and Finch/Steeles to Union Station at Front Street (north to south). An average fare on the TTC is $3.00. If you’re looking for a quicker alternative, you can take a taxi in the city, with a starting rate at $4.50. Cabs in Toronto can be notoriously expensive so be careful. An average ride from outside the downtown core can cost $20 to $25. Uber or Uber X is also another alternative. If you are traveling to the suburbs such as Markham, Mississauga, or Brampton, the GO Transit system (via bus or train) will help you get there efficiently if you don’t drive. Prices vary based on your destination; however, an average price to Mississauga one way is $7.Living in Toronto

3. Rush Hour
Rush hour in Toronto lasts from 6:30am to 9:30am during morning weekdays and around 4:00pm to 6:30pm during weekday evenings. It is at its peak during 8am and 5 to 6pm, respectively. Traffic congestion is one of the major issues as Toronto has expanded. If you live downtown or near your workplace in one of our central locations, the best alternative is to walk or bike to work to avoid the crowds altogether. On the TTC, do expect to wait one or two trains, especially on the Yonge/University line due to congestion. Union Station is also in a state of significant transformation with new exits so give yourself time to navigate in the morning. Alternatively, you can commute in less peak hours to give yourself plenty of time to reach your destination.

Living in Toronto

4. Construction
Toronto continues to expand significantly as it has done so over the past 10 to 15 years. Over 100,000 condominium units are currently being constructed (source) and according to a report in the Toronto Star, our metropolis is home to more than 44 high rises exceeding 150 metres. As the city gears up for the Pan Am Games, you’ll see a lot of delays on major routes, the main one being the Lakeshore between Yonge and Spadina, which is slowly but surely improving in terms of development. Always map out your route and double check the TTC website before you travel anywhere in the city if you don’t know it well. Downtown, it may be easier to walk certain places than it is to take the TTC.

Living in Toronto

5. A City of Neighbourhoods
Toronto is known as a city of neighbourhoods (complete with our own toques!) and the best part of this city is feeling like you’re constantly a tourist, whether it’s trying a new, ethnic restaurant or going to a cultural event. If you like to be near the water, The Beaches, Scarborough Bluffs, or Lakeshore West might be good options for you. Downtown, you are close to the funkiest areas complete with shopping, restaurants and nightlife downtown or by Queen, King, or Kensington Market. Yorkville and Rosedale/Summerhill are a bit more lush. North York is right by the subway line with plenty of parks and dining options. For those wanting more family-friendly neighbourhoods, Roncesvalles, High Park, The Danforth, and Leslieville are great options.

Living in Toronto

6. It Can Be Difficult to Meet People
Living in a big and constantly changing urban centre like Toronto can make it difficult to meet people. The best solution to this urban issue is to join a club. There are plenty of interesting clubs out there depending on your interest. The Toronto Sport and Social Club is a great addition to your workout routine, or you could join a quirky club like an axe throwing league (yes, that exists!). Volunteering is another way to meet new friends while giving back to the community. Sites like Charity Village can help you find what interests you. Likely, there is a club for whatever your interest happens to be.

Of course, do check out any events happening where you can meet other residents in your DelSuites condo.

A big city like Toronto can take a bit of getting used to but once you settle into the city (and your short term rental in Toronto, which will make life a bit easier for you), you’ll find yourself calling it home sooner than later. Just make sure you pronounce it “Toronna” and not “Tore-on-tow.”

Community Events, Downtown Toronto, Entertainment

Film Events in Toronto

March 31, 2015

Film Events in TorontoWith the advent of video streaming services like Netflix and now Shomi and Crave, you may think that the era of going out to see a movie is dying (we don’t blame you for wanting to stay in your furnished apartment after a long week). That said, Torontonians are fierce fans of movies and are keeping the film industry alive with these events, services and stores, year-round, long after TIFF is over. If you are in town for TIFF or related film events in Toronto or you are filming here with your production studio, DelSuites can assist you with your accommodation needs.

1. TIFF Bell LightBox
Now headquarters for all things for the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), the Bell Lightbox is also home to daily screenings, film exhibitions, a gift shop, and two great restaurants, Luma and Canteen. It is a must-see on the Toronto tour, especially if you’re a fan of film. Luckily, it’s just around the corner from our suites at 300 Front, The Element, and The Icon. This year, Andy Warhol’s exhibition, Stars of the Silver Screen debuts on October 30, 2015. Save the date!Film Events in Toronto

2. Hot Docs
From April 23 to May 3, 2015 enjoy Toronto’s other film festival, this time of international documentaries, which you usually won’t see anywhere else, invoking in-depth conversation. Doc Soup is Hot Docs’ monthly screening series from October through April at the Bloor Cinema. Guest directors are available at selected screenings to introduce their work and answer questions from the audience. Early bird packages and passes are now available on sale online.

3. Repertory Cinemas.
Rep cinemas bring back the by-gone era of going out to the movie theatre. The difference at a rep cinema is that you can see older films, usually a one-off or as part of a theme. The Bloor Cinema is festival headquarters for Hot Docs but others we know and love are The Royal on College Street and The Fox in the Beaches (worth the trek to the end of the streetcar line on Queen Street East).

4. The National Film Board.
Located in the heart of downtown acroFilm Events in Torontoss from the Scotiabank movie theatre at Queen and John, is the National Film Board (affectionately known as the NFB). The NFB is Canada’s National film producer and distributor. This is your place to watch free films and documentaries, and animations, available in both English and French. Here’s a guide of films for your first visit.

5. Quirky Video Stores.
Yes, video stores still exist and some of them offer some unique services. We love the Film Buff for its selection of under-represented independent, foreign, documentary and classic films in addition to its tasty ice cream (Roncesvalles location only) and Queen Video for its art film selections. Super-8 Filmmaker John Porter continues to add to his useful creation of a handmade map and directory for visiting filmmakers and artists in the city, including those video stores. This is a great link for those wanting a more comprehensive directory for their film needs.

Do you know any hidden gems on where to see a movie or get your film fix in Toronto? What are your favourite movies?

Community Events, Downtown Toronto, Entertainment, Family Vacations in Toronto, Holiday Events, Toronto Family Travel, Vacation Travel

Five March Break Activities for the Family

March 17, 2015

Schools Out! March BreakIf you are not one of the 116,000 people traveling during the March Break period (March 16-20), this is your time to explore Toronto with your family. We have written about our favourite family-friendly activities in Toronto previously here, but here are a few March break activities and ideas to keep your children entertained during the week.

1. Disney Classics at the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Watch some of the famed movie maker’s classics on the big screen and relive your childhood too! If you’re staying in one of our furnished suites downtown, there is no excuse not to go to these special screenings. There are also March Break camps and to start planning early, summer camps for your kids.

2. The Toronto Public Library’s (TPL) March Break Program. The TPL has a variety of activities for both kids and teens, including a Lego program and a first-aid babysitting course.

March Break Activities3. A Day Trip. One of  our favourite March Break activities for the day would be to the Kortright Centre for Conservation, where you and your kids can learn about sustainability, hike, and also participate in their maple syrup programs. Nearby, is the McMichael Art Gallery, a great alternative from the Art Gallery of Ontario to learn about Canadian art. March Break camps are also available here. The Toronto Zoo is another great idea for a day trip if your kids love animals; they have special programming for the week.

4. Stay In. Sometimes, a day at home is overrated. Cook with the kids. Break out the arts and crafts. Watch a favourite or new movie on the couch or have a sleepover for your kids and their friends. Many of our locations also have a pool so this might be a fun way to break up your days.

5. Visit the Aga Khan Museum. One of Toronto’s newest attractions, the architectural masterpiece is also your gateway to learn more about Muslim civilizations. The museum and all of its exhibitions are free every Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. There is also a special March Break camp for your kids. If you are brave enough and have the energgroup students jumping end of exam yeary, you could also plan an excursion afterwards to the Ontario Science Centre, which is located nearby.

What are your favourite March break activities to do with your family in the city? However, if you are traveling with your family, here are some of our tips to handle the journey with ease.